Translating Research into Practice

Jan
19

Situational Risk Factors related to Racial Bias and Policing

Situational risk factors common to patrol policing—such as discretion, novice status, crime focus, cognitive demand, and identity threats—can make bias more likely to result in discrimination. This is the bottom line of a recently published article in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law. Below is a summary of this research review. Featured Article | Psychology, Public […]

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Jan
12

Psychological Research Has Had Minimal Impact on Practice in the Field of Child Protection

Psychology has contributed to the knowledge base and available assessment and intervention methods in the three following areas of child protection: (a) interviewing children to assess child maltreatment, (b) the well-being of children involved with the child protection system, and (c) evidence-based practices to ameliorate the effects of child maltreatment among children involved with the […]

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Jan
05

Promises and Pitfalls of the “Research-to-Policy-Pipeline” Process

Policymaking is complex and incorporates many factors and voices. Rigorous empirical evidence is one potential factor in this process, but the degree to which it is built into, sought after, or accepted in policymaking varies considerably. This is the bottom line of a recently published article in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law. Below is a […]

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Dec
29

Do you take the deal? What we know and don’t know about guilty pleas

As guilty pleas are on the rise worldwide, we need to invest more effort into understanding what drives this phenomenon. This is the bottom line of a recently published article in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law. Below is a summary of the research and findings as well as a translation of this research into practice. […]

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Dec
22

Psychology’s Influence on Prisons and Imprisonment

Psychology has had several influences on prisons and imprisonment. This article reflects on four of these. This is a summary of a recently published article in Psychology, Public, Policy, and Law. Below is a summary of the research and findings as well as a translation of this research into practice. Featured Article | Psychology, Public […]

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Dec
15

TOMM Cut Scores May Not Generalize to Spanish-Speaking Adults

Cultural differences and age may impact scores on the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) among Spanish-speaking adults from Latin America; therefore, caution must be used when interpreting test results from this population. This is the bottom line of a recently published article in Law and Human Behavior. Below is a summary of the research and […]

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Dec
08

Sexual assault disclosures among undergraduate resident assistants

Undergraduate resident assistants’ reporting behaviors are determined by knowledge of university sexual assault reporting policy, trust in these support systems and perceptions of mandatory reporting. This is the bottom line of a recently published article in Law and Human Behavior. Below is a summary of the research and findings as well as a translation of […]

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Dec
01

Keep Your Bias to Yourself: The Impact of Deliberating with Differently Biased Jurors

The current study examined the influence of pretrial publicity on mock-jurors’ guilt decisions, perceptions of the defendant, memories, and evidence interpretation and found that pretrial publicity can bias jurors’ interpretations and that deliberations can result in the transfer of bias from tainted to untainted jurors. This is the bottom line of a recently published article […]

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Nov
24

ODARA + SARA = Prediction of Intimate Partner Violence and General Criminal Recidivism

The combination of two risk measures, the Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment (ODARA) and the Spousal Assault Risk Assessment (SARA), has been effective in assessing violence risk and predicting recidivism in intimate partner violence offenders. This is the bottom line of a recently published article in Law and Human Behavior. Below is a summary of […]

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Nov
17

Disgust Reactions from Color Photographs Make Jurors More Conviction Prone

Mock jurors were randomly assigned to view either nongruesome photographs or gruesome photographs in color or black and white. Color gruesome photographs, compared to nongruesome photographs, increased convictions due to the disgust reactions they elicited. This was especially pronounced for mock jurors with relatively higher awareness of their bodily sensations. The effects of gruesome photographs […]

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Nov
10

Mandatory reporters’ knowledge, perception, and trust in Title IX

As a resident assistant (RA), a mandatory reporting role under Title IX, the likelihood to report and refer fellow student sexual assault varied, depending on RAs’ knowledge of reporting procedures and resources, trust in these supports, and perceptions of mandatory reporting policy. This is the bottom line of a recently published article in Law and […]

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Nov
03

Was it something else, buddy? A “something else” alternative does not increase accuracy of answers in forensic interviews with children

The addition of a “something else” alternative to forced-choice questions in forensic interviews with children does not increase the accuracy of answers and does not bypass forced-choice question limitations. This is the bottom line of a recently published article in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law. Below is a summary of the research and findings as […]

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