Hip Hop, Mental Health & Black Males

In this episode, Dr. James Norris discusses how he utilizes hip hop music in his counseling practice to encourage authentic communication with clients. He gives practical suggestions on how to incorporate hip hop with clients who are drawn to this genre of music

Hip Hop, Mental Health & Black Males

Episode

In this episode, Dr. James Norris discusses how he utilizes hip hop music in his counseling practice to encourage authentic communication with clients. He gives practical suggestions on how to incorporate hip hop with clients who are drawn to this genre of music.

Guest

Dr. James P. Norris received his PhD from the University of the Cumberlands in the School of Social and Behavioral Science in Counselor Education and Supervision. He is an Assistant Professor at the University of the Cumberlands. He is a licensed mental health counselor in WA state and a licensed professional counselor in AZ. He currently owns a private practice and is the founder of Matumaini Counseling and Community Center, a non-profit that provides psychoeducation, social justice, and advocacy work around mental health in the African American community. In 2019, he was an NBCC Fellow and a part of the 2020 cohort for the Emerging Leaders program with WACES. His research areas of interest include trauma and the incorporation of Hip Hop in the counseling profession. 

Resources

https://ithembacounseling.com/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-p-norris-ph-d-lmch-wa-lpc-az-ncc-264351b9/ 

Transcript

https://otter.ai/u/jnVi9C4DeHk356z9gWn3Ivqryk8?utm_source=copy_url

Citation

Jones, M. (Producer). (2023, June 16). Hip Hop, Mental Health and Black Males [Audio Podcast]. The Thoughtful Counselor. Retrieved from https://concept.paloaltou.edu/resources/the-thoughtful-counselor-podcast/hip-hop-mental-health-black-males 

Photo by Gordon Cowie on Unsplash

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