Mindfulness Activity #11

Mindfulness Activity #11
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Today’s practice is an invitation to acceptance the present moment and everything about it in order to offer compassion to ourselves. Often, we tell ourselves to “suck it up.” We may ignore our own feelings, tell ourselves we should be coping better, or put ourselves and our own needs at the bottom of the to-do list.

Sometimes, it is true that we need to avoid our needs or feelings in the moment, in order to be effective. In fact, that is a skill that therapists teach people to do. The problem comes when that becomes a habit. The expression, “being one’s own harshest critic” expresses when acceptance of ourselves and our feelings becomes out of balance. When we have thoughts that other people are handling things better than we are or that we “should be better,” we lack self-compassion. Helping others requires that we accept ourselves and our feelings in the present moment with gentleness and compassion, like we might offer a friend. Similarly, being effective and changing things we wish to improve in ourselves also requires that we accept ourself and our present state without judgment.

Please use the following mindfulness practice link to cultivate self-compassion.

 

Throughout the day today, make it your intention to notice the inner critic in you and to respond by gently turning your mind towards acceptance of yourself.

Have a peaceful day!

Michele Galietta, Ph.D.

Michele-Galietta

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